New Zika Vaccine Shows Protection in Monkeys - Science Magazine

New Therapeutic Vaccine Approach Holds Promise for HIV Remission

Nature International Weekly Journal of Science, November 9th, 2016

Beth Israel Is Launching a Zika Vaccine Trial

Boston Magazine, September 14th, 2016

THE RACE FOR A ZIKA VACCINE  

The New Yorker, August 22nd, 2016

Two Zika vaccine candidates shown to completely protect mice from the virus

Nature International Weekly Journal of Science, June 28th, 2016

'Striking' results from early Zika vaccine trial

Science Magazine, August 10th, 2016

U.S. Senator Ed Markey Visits CVVR

Senator Markey speaks with Dr. Dan Barouch about the research being done at the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research.

Senator Markey speaks with Dr. Dan Barouch about the research being done at the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research.

Principal Investigator and Assistant Professor of Medicine, Dr. Kathryn Stephenson discusses the work being done in the lab.

Principal Investigator and Assistant Professor of Medicine, Dr. Kathryn Stephenson discusses the work being done in the lab.

Dr. Dan Barouch and Senator Markey speak to other doctors and researchers in the Center about the importance of Zika research.

Dr. Dan Barouch and Senator Markey speak to other doctors and researchers in the Center about the importance of Zika research.

The lab team with Senator Markey, a proponent of government-funded Zika research.

The lab team with Senator Markey, a proponent of government-funded Zika research.

The Boston Red Sox Celebrate the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research

As the official hospital of the Boston Red Sox, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center not only has First Aid Stations set up at Fenway Park, but also has a strong working relationship with it's physicians.  As part of the Red Sox and BIDMC partnership, the Red Sox organization chooses an outstanding physician or researcher to celebrate in a pre-game ceremony at every Friday home game.  On July 8th, Dr. Dan Barouch from the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research was chosen as a BIDMC All Star in honor of his leadership in HIV research.

 

A Red Sox official introduces Dr. Dan Barouch, being honored for his leadership in HIV research.

A Red Sox official introduces Dr. Dan Barouch, being honored for his leadership in HIV research.

Dr. Barouch being given an honorary Red Sox jersey while being recognized as a Medical All-Star.

Dr. Barouch being given an honorary Red Sox jersey while being recognized as a Medical All-Star.

Dr. Barouch and a Red Sox official pose with Wally for a photo opp after being honored as a Medical All-Star.

Dr. Barouch and a Red Sox official pose with Wally for a photo opp after being honored as a Medical All-Star.

Boston-Based Research Shows Promise for Zika Virus Vaccine

  • WGHB News
  • By:  Marilyn Schairer & Michael Agnello

Researchers at Boston's Beth Israel  Deaconess Medical Center have made some promising advances in developing a vaccine to halt the spread of the mosquito-born Zika virus.

Less than a year after Brazilian officials confirmed the country’s first case in 2015, the World Health Organization declared the virus a public health emergency due to its link to fetal microcephaly. Since then, health officials have made stopping the spread of the Zika virus  a global priority.

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Zika Update: Two New Zika Vaccine Effective in Mouse Models

  • Nature World News
  • By Jean Raphael

Two new vaccines against Zika virus have proven its effectiveness in preclinical trials involving mice challenged with Zika virus, suggesting that Zika vaccines for humans are still achievable.

Their findings, published in the journal Nature, showed that the two experimental vaccines have protected mice from ZIka virus four to eight weeks after receiving the initial injections.

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New Studies Show Just How Tricky the Zika Virus Is

  • NBC News
  • by MAGGIE FOX

A batch of new studies show the Zika virus is trickier than it appeared at first glance, lurking for months in pregnant females and interfering with the immune system's response.

The findings help explain why the virus seems so mild in some people, yet causes devastating birth defects. And while the data suggests it is not going to be so easy to fight the epidemic, at least two studies offer some hope for a good, protective vaccine.

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How An Electric Shock Could One Day Protect You From Zika

This summer, it's not just athletes who are looking to set world records. Scientists are also trying to break a record — for how quickly they can make a vaccine for a new virus.

It's for Zika. And one team is leading the pack.

The biotech company Inovio just got the first approval from the Food and Drug Administration to test an experimental vaccine in people. They've already shown the virus protects monkeys from Zika, says the company's president, Joseph Kim. And a small study begins in people in a few weeks.

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2 Types of Vaccines Protect Against Zika Virus in Mice: Interview

  • WBUR
  • By Jonathan Cain

"We hope that this news will electrify and galvanize the vaccine effort against Zika virus," says Dr. Dan Barouch of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School.

Barouch is senior author of a paper just out in the journal Nature reporting some promising findings on potential Zika vaccines — at least, in mice. Researchers found that two different types of vaccines — one using DNA and one using an inactivated form of the virus — seemed to confer complete protection against the virus that has been declared a public health emergency through much of the Americas.

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Breakthrough Zika Vaccine Under Development by Boston Researchers

  • The Boston Herald
  • Lindsay Kalter

A group of researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center are testing a vaccine for the Zika virus they say has exceeded expectations in animal trials, requiring only one shot to effectively stave off the disease that has been linked to devastating birth defects.

“The protection was striking,” said lead researcher Daniel Barouch, director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel. “This gives us an option for a safe and effective vaccine for humans.”

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Two New Vaccines Protect Mice From Zika Virus Infection

STAT News

Two new experimental vaccines protect mice against the Zika virus, a study out Tuesday shows.

Researchers from governments, academic labs, and biopharma companies have been rushing to develop Zika vaccines since global health experts started warningabout the previously unknown dangers wrought by the mosquito-borne virus,  including serious birth defects. Just last week, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first human testing of a Zika vaccine candidate from the company Inovio Pharmaceuticals.

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Inside the U.S. Army Lab Racing to Create a Zika Vaccine

  • Wired Magazine
  • Eric Niller

Rafael de la Barrera reaches into a freezer and pulls out a plastic jug of rusty-red liquid. He wipes frost off the label: “Zika Virus – Puerto Rico strain. 24Mar16.” The liquid—stored at -80 degrees F to keep the malicious virus inert—is a solution isolated from monkey liver cells. If the US Army pulls off this ambitious research effort, it’ll be one of the ingredients in a vaccine for the microcephaly-causing disease sweeping through the Americas.

Barrera, a lab supervisor at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Silver Spring, Md., has a personal stake in this work. He’s a native of Colombia, where Zika has been ravaging much of the countryside, including his hometown. “I have family members who are infected,” Barrera says. “This is one of the reasons why we spend hours and hours working on this.”

Barrera and his team of about 10 scientists and technicians have been working full-time on Zika for the past six months. “It’s the virus du jour,” he jokes.

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Top HIV Scientists Awarded $42 Million in National Institutes of Health Funding to Improve Efficacy of HIV Vaccine Platforms

BIDMC, OHSU to Lead Consortium Exploring Vaccine Candidate and Cure Strategies

BOSTON - With $42 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health, scientists from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) will lead a five-year research initiative to advance efforts to cure and prevent HIV/AIDS.  Dan Barouch, MD, PhD, Director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at BIDMC, and Louis Picker, MD, Assistant Director of the OHSU Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute, will lead a consortium of researchers from across the country exploring the mechanisms behind promising new HIV vaccine candidates and potential cure strategies. 

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Researchers Uncover Earliest Events Following HIV Infection, Before Virus Is Detectable

Findings Could Lead to New HIV Prevention Strategies

BOSTON – New research in monkeys exposed to SIV, the animal equivalent of HIV, reveals what happens in the very earliest stages of infection, before virus is even detectable in the blood, which is a critical but difficult period to study in humans. The findings, published online today in the journal Cell, have important implications for vaccine development and other strategies to prevent infection.

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CVVR Volunteer Registry is Now Live!

The Center for Virology and Vaccine Research launched a Volunteer Registry for adults interested in clinical trial participation on December 21st, 2015. The new CVVR Clinical Trials Unit established the Volunteer Registry in anticipation of CVVR clinical trials beginning this year at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. These clinical trials will connect the CVVR lab bench where the research vaccines were developed to the research volunteer’s bedside where the vaccines will be administered, all under the roof of BIDMC. Research volunteers are essential to clinical trials. The Volunteer Registry brings together researchers and volunteers with the common goal of helping others live healthier lives. The purpose of the Volunteer Registry is to collect and maintain information that people voluntarily supply so they may be contacted by the CVVR Clinical Trials Unit about participating in future studies. To find out more information about the Volunteer Registry follow this link: http://cvvr.hms.harvard.edu/registry or to join the Volunteer Registry please call the Clinical Trials Unit at (617)-735-4610 or follow this link:   https://redcap.bidmc.harvard.edu/redcap/surveys/?s=MKTMD7NKLH.

amfAR Gives $2 Million to CVVR Researchers to Study HIV Eradication

amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research, announced on July 21st that a CVVR research team has been awarded $2 million to pursue a range of strategies aimed at curing HIV. The team of researchers will be led by Dan Barouch, M.D., Ph.D., and will investigate the ability of combinations of antibodies to specifically kill latently infected cells in the lab, in monkeys, and then in people. The researchers will test two promising antibodies alone and together, in combination with a newly described drug that can "shock" the virus out of latently infected cells and possibly enhance the ability of the antibodies to locate the infected cells.

See full press release from amfAR here 

Does NK Memory Exist? The Reeves Lab Shows It Does

Keith Reeves and colleagues at CVVR published in Nature Immunology this month that robust, durable, antigen-specific natural killer (NK) cell memory can be induced in primates after both infection and vaccination. This data upsets the long held maxim that NK cells are nonspecific parts of the innate immune system, and raises the possibility that NK cells might be harnessed in the development of vaccines for HIV and other pathogens.

Article at Nature Immunology

The Bad Side of CD4 T Cells

CVVR in the News:

"Vaccine-Induced CD4 T Cells Lead to Adverse Effect in a Mouse Model of Infection" - Science Daily, Jan 15, 2015

"A study led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) has found that a vaccine that elicits only CD4 T cells against a mouse model of a chronic viral infection results in an overwhelming -- and lethal -- inflammatory response. Reported in the January 16, 2015 issue of the journal Science, the new findings provide a cautionary tale for the development of vaccines aimed at eliciting robust CD4 T cell immunity against chronic infections, including HIV." See full article >

New Vaccine Shows Protection in Monkeys

Dan Barouch and colleagues reported in the journal Science on July 17th that an adenovirus-based HIV vaccine demonstrated complete protection in 50% of vaccinated animals against a series of repeated, heterologous, intrarectal SIV challenges that infected all controls. Protective efficacy correlated with the functionality of Env-specific antibody responses. Comparable protection was also observed with a similar Ad/Env vaccine against repeated, heterologous, intrarectal SHIV-SF162P3 challenges. Clinical trials of these vaccine candidates are ongoing, in collaboration with Johnson and Johnson, the U.S. Military HIV Research Program, the International AIDS Vaccine Institute, and the U.S. National Institutes of Health.